Content Summary – Scripture Engagement Charts

Unfamiliar

World view, culture, and faith tradition distant from Christianity; no opportunity to engage or disengage with Scripture

Nineveh
“Then the word of the LORD came to Jonah a second time: ‘Go to the great city of Nineveh and proclaim to it the message I give you.’ ” (Jonah 3)

Remotely Familiar

Vague awareness of Christianity; adherents revere a sacred text/book, but have little or no knowledge of the Scripture’s message

Samaritan Woman at the Well
“The woman said to him, ‘I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.’ ” (John 4)

Hostilely Familiar

Engaged in alternative ideologies,traditions,and sacred texts; hostile to the Christian religion and the Bible as a whole

The Stoning of Stephen
“They were enraged, and they ground their teeth at him … They cried out with a loud voice and stopped their ears and rushed together at him. Then they cast him out of the city and stoned him.” (Acts 7)

Cynically Familiar

Engaging Scripture spitefully, selectively, cynically; openly critical of Christianity and its message

Philosophers of Athens
“A group of Epicurean and Stoic philosophers began to debate with him. Some of them asked, ‘What is this babbler trying to say?’ ”When they heard about the resurrection of the dead, some of them sneered …” (Acts 17)

Respectfully Familiar

Engaged in alternative ideologies and sacred texts;respectful of Christianity historicity but not engaged with the message

A Pharisee named Gamaliel
“In the present case I advise you: Leave these men alone! Let them go! For if their purpose or activity is of human origin, it will fail. But if it is from God, you will not be able to stop these men; you will only find yourselves fighting against God.” (Acts 5)

Distortedly Familiar

Scripture engagement in an unorthodox context;veers from historical creeds and doctrines of the Christian Church

Savage Wolves in Ephesus
“I know that after I leave, savage wolves will come in among you and will not spare the flock.Even from your own number men will arise and distort the truth in order to draw away disciples after them.So be on your guard!” (Acts 20)

Cautiously Familiar

Aware of Scripture but cautious of the message;content to stay at arm’s length

King Agrippa in Caesarea
King Agrippa said to Paul, “Do you think that in such a short time you can persuade me to be a Christian?” (Acts 25)

Nominally Familiar

Sporadically and sparsely engaged in Scripture;not grasping the true essence of the message

Words of Jesus
“Why do you not understand what I am saying? It is because you are unable to accept my message.” (John 8)

Curiously Familiar

Curious about the message of Scripture;probing, examining, listening, open

Lydia of Thyatira, a seller of purple goods
“The Lord opened her heart to pay attention to what was said by Paul.” (Acts 16)

Ethiopian Eunuch
“Do you understand what you are reading?”And he [the Ethiopian] said, “How can I, unless someone guides me?” (Acts 8)

Devotionally Familiar

Engaged in the Christian message; devoted, following; worldview influenced by Scripture

Believers in Jerusalem
“They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer.” (Acts 2)

Studiously Familiar

Deeply engaged in Scripture’s text;seekers of truth, probing meaning, historicity, literary forms

Believers of Berea
“Now the Berean Jews were of more noble character than those in Thessalonica, for they received the message with great eagerness and examined the Scriptures every day to see if what Paul said was true.” (Acts 17)

Holistically Familiar

Devoutly engaged in Scripture;entire worldview shaped by belief in Christ and Scripture;both awed and inspired by the message

Apostle Peter on the Day of Pentecost, Jerusalem
“Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Messiah.”When the people heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and the other apostles, “Brothers, what shall we do?” (Acts 2)